Via Todd Watts for 2014:

"Here is a bit of additional info. On the 24th of August (2014) we will begin our sixth year. Volunteer observers will be needed and anyone can participate. To date, 17 species of raptor have been observed migrating past the watch site. Our single day high count was set on September 17 with 3406 raptors. Season counts have ranged from just under 3000 to nearly 8000 hawks. Up to 11 species of raptor have been observed in a single day. Raptors can be quite close (as little as 1 or 2 meters away) or appear as distant specks. For additional info go to the Saint John Naturalists Club website, Hawkcount.org or our facebook page. Much info is also posted on the naturenb listserve. The site is on private land, so please contact me before heading to the mountain. 

<p>Todd Watts</p> <p>Official Counter and Co-ordinator</p>
<p>Greenlaw Mountain Hawk Watch </p>">

Thanks and keep looking up!

Todd Watts

Official Counter and Co-ordinator

Greenlaw Mountain Hawk Watch

Mid-September to mid-October is the very best, especially just after the passgage of a cold front. At one point they apparently saw almost 3500 hawks (!!!!!) in one day, the vast majority of which were BROAD-WINGED HAWKS (3316). Jim Wilson, a well-known veteran birder from Hampton, NB, said he has never seen as many in his entire life! It is also perhaps the best day they have had there so far since the hawk watch has been up and running (in 2009), but this certainly puts it on a whole new level and it is RIGHT HERE in NB (down by Saint Andrews)! The hawk watch is on private land, so if you would like to go, you need to contact Todd Watts, the hawk watch coordinator. He has left his coordinates on the Events tab on BirdingNB here:

 

Greenlaw Mountain Hawkwatch- events

 

Also, to subscribe to their Facebook page and get updates, you can go here:

 

GMHW

 

Finally, I first heard about the incredible day they had by being a member of the Nature NB listserve. A lot of great topics are discussed here, but recently a lot of fascinating chatter has been about all the rare birds that show up during migration,as September is such a busy month that way and not too much of that has filtered down to this site. Anyone can subscribe and it is another great way to find out more about what is going in nature in New Brunswick. For more info on that, just follow the instructions on the link below:

 

Nature NB listserve

 

Finally, if you would like to follw what is going at hawk watch sites across North America, check out this Facebook page:

 

Hawk Migration Association of North America

 

Anyway, I thought this may well be of interest to some of you who did not already know, as I know that many of the members here (Merv Cormier, Stu Tingley, Gilles Belliveau, Ron Arsenault, Hank Scarth, Paul Mansz, Joanne Savage, Ron Wilson, David Christie, and many more...) are already well aware of this and already an integral part (and followers of) Nature NB.

 

All the best,

 

Denis

 

 

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Here is a bit of additional info. On the 24th of August we will begin our sixth year. Volunteer observers will be needed and anyone can participate. To date, 17 species of raptor have been observed migrating past the watch site. Our single day high count was set on September 17 with 3406 raptors. Season counts have ranged from just under 3000 to nearly 8000 hawks. Up to 11 species of raptor have been observed in a single day. Raptors can be quite close (as little as 1 or 2 meters away) or appear as distant specks. For additional info go to the Saint John Naturalists Club website, Hawkcount.org or our facebook page. Much info is also posted on the naturenb listserve. The site is on private land, so please contact me before heading to the mountain. 

Thanks and keep looking up!

Todd Watts

Official Counter and Co-ordinator

Greenlaw Mountain Hawk Watch 

Thanks for the update, Todd. I have integrated your info into the main post.

Thanks for mentioning Greenlaw Mountain Hawk Watch Denis. It's maintained as one of the projects of Saint John Naturalists' Club. The other project is Point Lepreau Bird Observatory which monitors Seabird migration. We are fortunate to have Todd as our official counter. He has many years of Hawk Watch experience under his belt and does a great deal of volunteer watching in both spring and in the fall when Greenlaw is officially monitored/reported. Greenlaw is a major Hawk Watch for Broad-winged Hawks on the Eastern Seaboard of North America. Non-raptor passers-by/ visitors are also given honourable mention in Todd's reports; for example: Sandhill Crane and various passerines such as Blue-winged Warbler sometimes find their way into Todd's reports!

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