True Bugs of the Maritimes (Hemiptera/Heteroptera and Homoptera)

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True Bugs of the Maritimes (Hemiptera/Heteroptera and Homoptera)

Hemiptères et Homoptères des Maritimes

A discussion group for exploring the fascinating insect group that are the True Bugs (Hemiptera and/or Heteroptera) and "Short-horned" Bugs (Homoptera) and their allies. (Please post only species seen/found in the Canadian Maritimes).


Members: 29
Latest Activity: Nov 6

This large group of insects includes...(among others)

Water Scorpions (Nepidae), Giant Water Bugs (Belostomatidae), Water Boatmen (Corixidae), Backswimmers (Notonectidae), Water Striders (Gerridae), Plant Bugs (Miridae), Cicadas (Cicadidae), Treehoppers (Membracidae), Leafhoppers (Cicadellidae), Stink Bugs (Pentatomidae), Spittlebugs (Cercopidae), Aphids (Aphididae)...etc.

Discussion Forum

Alder Spittlebug [Clasroptera obtusa] Nov. 3/17 Quispamsis noted on side of house in daytime

Started by Joanne Savage Nov 6. 0 Replies

I did have to consult a friend who knows far more than I when it comes to such critters.…Continue

Cottongrass seed head bug

Started by Chris Adam. Last reply by Chris Adam Sep 25. 2 Replies

This 3mm true bug was found deep within a cottongrass (Eriophorum) seed head on 16 Sep 2017. Specimen KR17-25. Looks more like Cymus discors than angustatus, both of which are found in NB. Family…Continue

Tags: discors, Cymus, Cymidae, Eriophorum, cottongrass

green nymph ID september 7,2019

Started by Tom Finck. Last reply by Tom Finck Sep 11. 2 Replies

Continue

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Comment by Chris Adam on April 15, 2016 at 13:57

Since yesterday -- 14 April 2016 -- I have been seeing Birch Catkin Bugs around my house in Fredericton. These will be found on, around or near birch trees (I have one in my front yard): LYGAEIDAE Ischnorhynchinae: Kleidocerys resedae - Birch Catkin Bug.

Comment by Jimmy Dee on May 26, 2014 at 18:33

Doing a little research to understand just what this group is, I came across this explanation from Berkeley University:

Some entomologists group both Hemiptera and Homoptera within the group Heteroptera; others use the name Heteroptera for what we have called the Hemiptera and use Hemiptera for the Heteroptera.

Now that I have a grasp on this group ... onward :)

 

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